Racing Career

SPORTS MEDICINE

GALLERY

 

 

 

Racing Kennel Supplies - What Every Trainer Needs

Vitamins: Supplements to cover any deficits in the diet

Rubs/DMSO: Heating rubs to increase local circulation, therefore promote healing in sore muscles. DMSO is an anti-inflammatory used topically particularly for joint, tendon and ligament injuries

Antibiotics: Broad spectrum to treat/prevent local infections in open wounds and cuts, tonsillitis, diarrhea, etc.

Anti-diarrheals: Alternative and complementary treatments to Antibiotics (ex. Immodium)

Vet-Wrap Tape: Elastic bandage that sticks to itself, not the dog.

Alcohol: Topical antiseptic which is also good for cleaning ears, disinfecting tools like tweezers, disinfecting skin, etc.

Hydrogen Peroxide: Treatment for open wounds and teeth cleaning.

Anti-fungal: Treatment for a variety of fungal infections that can affect the skin (ex. Tincture of Iodine, Betadine, Fungicide, Gentian Violet, etc.)

Electrolytes: For prevention and stabilization of dehydration situations that might arise from heavy work, extreme weather, stress due to illness, etc.

Bag of Fluids: Sterile plain physiological fluids for any case where intravenous re-hydration is necessary

Aspirin: Basic pain relief and anti-inflammatory. Helps to reduce temperature in fever

Potassium supplement: Replacement for depletion due to stress (see electrolytes). Essential to correct muscle function

Calcium: Essential for bone growth, muscle function (including heart muscles) and assists in the utilization of phosphorus

Canine Performance Inhibitors

There are 3 general conditions that have a detrimental affect on performance:

Fatigue

The moment fatigue sets in, it will begin to diminish the level of performance.  Energy and focus is diverted away from the activity and utilized by the body to maintain function. Designing a training and conditioning program to suit the type of work or athletic event your dog competes in can minimize the affects of fatigue.  The program should address: Genetics (breeding), Training, Conditioning, Nutrition, and Health Care.

Pain

The effects of pain on performance usually go unnoticed.  The dog has the ability to minimize pain by altering body movement in such a way that the abnormality is unperceivable by the naked eye.  This altered movement created by the primary cause of pain puts altered forces upon the rest of the body.  In the athletic or active dog these abnormal forces lead to secondary and tertiary gait problems.  At some point in this chain of events breakdown occurs and an injury will be t- If the drive to compete is not in the dog it does not matter what kind of condition the dog is in it will not perform at it's full potential.  This psychology could be a result of genetics or training, or it could be medical.   Both of the two previous affecters can alter the psychology or drive of the canine athlete.  Sometimes the will to perform will over-ride these conditions.  This can be good for a single event, but can push the body past normal limits which can affect future performances.  The effects of fatigue or pain will then act to divert attention away from the competitive performance or daily task.  Before beginning any animal behavior therapy the medical problems should be resolved.- The effects of pain on performance usually go unnoticed.  The dog has the ability to minimize pain by altering body movement in such a way that the abnormality is unperceivable by the naked eye.  This altered movement created by the primary cause of pain puts altered forces upon the rest of the body.  In the athletic or active dog these abnormal forces lead to secondary and tertiary gait problems.  At some point in this chain of events breakdown occurs and an injury will be aggravated to a perceivable extent.

Psychology

If the drive to compete is not in the dog it does not matter what kind of condition the dog is in it will not perform at it's full potential.  This psychology could be a result of genetics or training, or it could be medical.   Both of the two previous affecters can alter the psychology or drive of the canine athlete.  Sometimes the will to perform will over-ride these conditions.  This can be good for a single event, but can push the body past normal limits which can affect future performances.  The effects of fatigue or pain will then act to divert attention away from the competitive performance or daily task.  Before beginning any animal behavior therapy the medical problems should be resolved.

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